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About John: Equipment: Stomp Boxes

These days, I typically only gig with one gain / drive option (ok, occasionally 2), reverb (depending on the amp), and sometimes a comp. Which ones I bring depend on the mood. That said, I still have some other funky options to play with when I'm recording or just goofing off at home. These are my tools.

Gain / Drive

Ibanez Tube Screamers: If there's one pedal I have a hard time living without, it's a Tube Screamer. I have several -- a couple of 90s TS9s (one Modded by Robert Keeley), a TS808 reissue, and a TS808-HW (handwired with true bypass). I used to have an old 80s rack mount multi effects unit that had an 808 in it but the connector for the pedal board died and the whole thing became useless (it also had a compressor, chorus, flanger, and phaser -- loved that thing to death....literally!). While they're clearly all in the same basic tonal family, each has a distinct character and response. I like them individually, or in a live situation chained together on different settings -- the cascading gain stages gives a huge range of overdrive sounds, particularly when driving the front end of a nice tube amp. If I'm trying to bring a minimalist rig to a gig and want to keep it to a single pedal, one of the 808s with the Deluxe or the Vibrolux Reverb is generally the choice. In Oversoul I started with the Trey-style chained Tube Screamer sounds in front of the ultra-clean Showman. While I always had at least one TS on my board, my Oversoul sound ended up drifting more towards the FullDrive and TC Distortion pedals which leaned towards the heavier gain sound. By the King Harvest years, most of my gain tones were back to various Tube Screamer combos in front of a Boogie early Mark III (black stripe).

Arc Effects Klone: The Klone is one of the crowded field of clones of the quintessential Klon Centaur. From clean boost to gritty gain with a lot of tone control, this thing does exactly what I love -- drive the front end of a tube amp, and give me an incredibly touch-responsive gain response that works with the dynamics of my playing style. Depending on the type of gig, this might be only pedal I bring (thought my Tube Screamers get jealous being left at home). There's nothing like it!

Fulltone Fulldrive: The original red model from back in 1995 (hand signed and dated inside by Mike Fuller). The overal sound is a broad band drive with a fuzzier and heavier breakup than the TS sound, and it has two separate channels (with a push pull knob on one to cut the natural compression), and a HUGE tone. Very flexible workhorse in one unit. This baby is all over the Oversoul Grow record. Mike Fullerton rocks! I've tried the newer ones, and they're nice, but they're just not quite the same...

T.C. Electronics Booster / Distortion: A very different sound than my other grit pedals -- a more focused, narrow band distortion sound that really cuts through, the T.C. is the go-to. Those Danish engineers know what they're doing, and they make TONS of great products. It works as a clean boost and DI, too. Bonus.

Tubeworks Tubedrive: Actual tube overdrive in a stomp-box. Hard wired AC line cable to power the onboard 12AX7, this was my first foray into actual tube overdrive (the Showman has so much clean headroom you can't get it to break up, and I didn't get the Deluxe or Vibrolux until much later). It's got a fuzzy drive that's full and warm but focused enough to not get out of control on higher gain settings, which is where I like it best. I used this quite a bit with Oversoul but ended up giving it to Zac at one point. Just got one again recently for old times' sake, and it just makes me want to play Oversoul songs!.

Boss OD-2r Turbo Overdrive: Perhaps I'm revealing my biases, but I really did not expect much out of a Boss distortion unit. I found this one at a pawn shop and it really suprised me with a fairly versatile, warm, smooth distortion sound. This one is nice when I want something that doesn't have too much specific character and doesn't cover up other elements in the mix. I used this a fair amount for rhythm sounds in King Harvest.

Time Based Effects

Catalinbread Topanga This unit was designed as an emulator for Fender's 60s tube-driven spring reverb tanks. I don't need the full blown saturated surf tone (I usually keep the reverb on a Fender amp at about 2 or 3...), but I love the authentic Fender reverb tone. For my vintage blackface Showman and Deluxe that don't have on-board reverb, so I set up the Topanga with the dwell way down, the mix on full, then jump the channels on the amp and pipe the Topanga back in through the normal channel, using the normal channel volume as the reverb control. It's amazing, and works great!

Keeley Abbey Chamber Verb This unit was designed as an emulator for a traditional recording studio echo chamber, styled after the likes of famous chambers at Abbey Road and others. Like the Catalinbread it has a mix control enabling 100% wet signal, so I use it on full wet, jumped through the Normal channel of my non-reverb amps (the Deluxe and Showman) for a different kind of reverb sound. Between the brilliance, predelay, and decay controls its got quite a wide range of reverb tones, and really sond fantastic when I'm looking for something more / different than the traditional Fender spring reverb sound.

MXR Analog Delay: VERY straightforward basic 70s era delay tank -- and speaking of tanks this thing is huge and bright green (kind of like a Tube Screamer, come to think of it...). Mine is the 3-output, no-LED model, so my best guess is late 70's, early 80's. I've actually got the original box and literature, which is rare for stuff like this. As with all of these, its hard wired for AC power, so a bit of a pain in the neck but worth it. I really don't need much in the delay department (just a little bit of slapback and I'm good to go), and this one delivers, despite being ugly as sin. Really, given that mostly I just like a little slapback, doesn't much matter to me that the delays max out at a couple hundred ms. I've tried the newer Carbon Copy models, and they add some bizarre kind of chorusy shimmer and modulation to the tone that always bugged me, so I went back to the old faithful.

T.C. Electronics Flashback: Another powerful and versatile mono / stereo delay, with a bunch of emulator modes including tape, analog, and more. Again, my delay needs are generally pretty limited and I'm generally good with a short analog delay, but there's a lot here to play with when I'm feeling experimental. It even has USB connectivity to sculpt and store settings (if I ever get the wild hair to put that much effort into playing with a foot pedal). What's more it acts as a looper, which I've been having a lot of fun working with in my solo playing.

Dynamics

Keeley Comp: Not quite the mojo and color of an old DynaComp, but a LOT quieter and generally more useful. Given the challenge of using a compressor with no LED on light in a live setting, I'm generally more inclined to use this one for performing. I've tried the 4 knob version as well and found it a little too smooth and transparent for my taste (for a guitar stomp box I'm more into the colored Ross / MXR style effects) and, given the additional controls, harder to dial in a good tone, so I've stuck with the original 2-knob version from the 90s.

Ibanez Compressor: Another effect from my UE400 (may she rest in peace), this is a nice colored compressor that I generally use to roll off transients and generally squeeze the signal to increase sustain on high gain leads. Sort of reminiscent of the Ross style compression, it does a great job doing what it does well without completely sucking the life out of the tone.

MXR DynaComp: Again, I've got a couple of these from various vintages, including one from the mid 80s (that sounds great, but annoyingly doesn't have an LED to see when it's on...). Definintely an acquired taste, and not particularly versatile, but the DynaComp has that distinctive Nashville sound on the country stuff (also nice on steel guitar). Tele on the bridge pickup, light TS crunch, a Fender amp, and I'm in chickin' pickin' heavin'.

Keeley Katana: After having Robert Keeley mod one of my TS9s, I started checking out his other stuff. I have long been an overdrive pedal fan (see above...), but the concept of a clean boost was a bit new to me when this one came out. That said, as a low-watt Blackface Fender devotee (and a guy who generally just leaves the volume knob on the guitar at 10), the Katana is awesome for pushing the front end of those amps and getting them to break up all by themselves -- almost like a channel switcher for a single channel amp. Pure clean gain either for volume boost for solos, or just to get the ampt to grind harder. Very nice unit.

Ernie Ball Volume: Not an "effect" per se, but this unit is essential. Totally passive (and absolutely silent) circuit, in a bulletproof annodized aluminum chassis. Used primarily with my steel guitars, I do occasionally kick over to it in an electric guitar solo for interesting effects, or to use it as a manual tremolo unit (listen to King Harvest's "December's Ghost" for an example).

Other

Ibanez Phaser: I originally fell in love with this effect (listen to the heavy phasing riff in the middle section of Don No One) from my 1981 UE400, which had a compressor, original TS808 tube screamer, chorus/flange, phaser, and an external effects loop all in one! When it died and I got rid of the unit (alas it was really only the footswitch that died...what a waste of a bunch of effects!), I went out in search of a replacement. NO luck on tracking down a full UE400 in good shape, but I did find the original stomp box version of the phaser at a pawn shop and bought it instantly.

Electro-vibe Micro Q-Tron: What can I say -- I learned to play guitar by jamming along to Grateful Dead tapes (yes, actual "tapes", anyone remember those?) and every now and then I can't help but throw down a few envelope filtered Jerry licks...

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